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History

2010 NFL Draft Round 1

Pick
Team
Player
Pos
School
1 St. Louis Rams Sam Bradford QB Oklahoma
2 Detroit Lions Ndamukong Suh DT Nebraska
3 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Gerald McCoy DT Oklahoma
4 Washington Redskins Trent Williams OT Oklahoma
5 Kansas City Chiefs Eric Berry S Tennessee
6 Seattle Seahawks Russell Okung OT Oklahoma St.
7 Cleveland Browns Joe Haden CB Florida
8 Oakland Raiders Rolando McClain LB Alabama
9 Buffalo Bills C.J. Spiller RB Clemson
10 Jacksonville Jaguars Tyson Alualu DT California
11 San Francisco 49ers Anthony Davis OT Rutgers
12 San Diego Chargers Ryan Matthews RB Fresno State
13 Philadelphia Eagles Brandon Graham DE Michigan
14 Seattle Seahawks Earl Thomas S Texas
15 New York Giants Jason Pierre-Paul DE South Florida
16 Tennessee Titans Derrick Morgan DE Georgia Tech
17 San Francisco 49ers Mike Iupati G Idaho
18 Pittsburgh Steelers Maurkice Pouncey C Florida
19 Atlanta Falcons Sean Weatherspoon LB Missouri
20 Houston Texans Kareem Jackson CB Alabama
21 Cincinnati Bengals Jermaine Gresham TE Oklahoma
22 Denver Broncos Demaryius Thomas WR Georgia Tech
23 Green Bay Packers Bryan Bulaga OT Iowa
24 Dallas Cowboys Dez Bryant WR Oklahoma State
25 Denver Broncos Tim Tebow QB Florida
26 Arizona Cardinals Dan Williams DT Tennessee
27 New England Patriots Devin McCourty CB Rutgers
28 Miami Dolphins Jared Odrick DT Penn State
29 New York Jets Kyle Wilson CB Boise State
30 Detroit Lions Jahvid Best RB California
31 Indianapolis Colts Jerry Hughes DE TCU
32 New Orleans Saints Patrick Robinson CB Florida State

A look back at the 2005 NFL Draft

The 2005 NFL Draft didn’t have the sizzle that others in recent memory have. The top 10 picks have only produced three Pro Bowlers, and none of those players own superstar status. In fact, it was the later rounds that produced some of the more notable names. There were even five undrafted players that went on to appear in Pro Bowls. Needless to say, 2005 wasn’t exactly the year of the scout. A look back now at the first round and grades on how those players and teams have fared in the five seasons since.

(Update: Little did we know Mike Williams would rebound the way he has, finding new life under Pete Carroll in Seattle. Nevertheless the “F” grade stands for the Lions because they certainly did nothing to bring him along as a player.)

Pick, Player, Team, Pos., School

1 Alex Smith, San Francisco 49ers, QB, Utah

Analysis: At least Smith is still with the 49ers, something that didn’t seem likely just a year ago at this time. Despite his 16-24 career record, head coach Mike Singletary still believes Smith is the guy, even more so than another former number one disappointment, David Carr. Injuries and a lack of stability on the 49ers coaching staff have hampered Smith’s development, which might help explain his 37-43 TD-INT ratio. Credit the organization for sticking by him. 2010 could be his last hurrah in the Bay Area for a San Francisco club that is on the rise in the NFC West. Grade: C-

2 Ronnie Brown, Miami Dolphins, RB, Auburn

Analysis: Brown has played 16 games in a season just once in five seasons, in 2008 when he earned his lone Pro Bowl berth. When healthy, Brown has given the Dolphins the hard-nosed, every-down runner that fits their offensive system – even with Ricky Williams in the mix. But having ended two of the last three campaigns on injured reserve make Williams’ presence all the more necessary. Brown averages 4.4 yards per carry and has scored 31 touchdowns thus far. Pretty good, but a tad sub par for a second overall pick. Grade: B-

3 Braylon Edwards, Cleveland Browns, WR, Michigan

Analysis: The often enigmatic Edwards ultimately wore out his welcome in Cleveland and was shipped off the Jets early last season. He amassed 1,000 yards just once in four full seasons with the Browns, in 2007 when he reached his only Pro Bowl. He seems to have found his groove in New York, providing Mark Sanchez a go-to target for a team that reached the AFC Championship Game last year. But the Browns never got the big-time playmaker they sought when they selected Edwards, just another in a long line of misses by the Mistake by the Lake Browns. Grade: C

4 Cedric Benson, Chicago Bears, RB, Texas

Analysis: Much like Edwards, Benson eventually became more of a headache than a success for the team that drafted him. Unlike Edwards, however, it was Benson’s off-the-field antics that rubbed the Bears organization the wrong way. He failed to outperform Thomas Jones, even when the team reached the Super Bowl after the 2006 season. 674 yards was his high-water mark in three years in the Windy City, but the Bengals saw something in Benson and indeed he resurrected his career there. Last season, Benson rushed for 1,251 yards in just 13 games, including a career-high 189 against his former team. Grade: C-

5 Carnell Williams, Tampa Bay, Buccaneers, RB, Auburn

Analysis: “Cadillac” has given the Bucs quite a ride when healthy, but that has been a novelty. He played just 10 games from 2007-08 after suffering a devastating knee injury. Since his stellar, 1,178-yard rookie campaign, Williams has struggled to produce consistently, in part because the Bucs have turned to several other backs to help contribute. His 3.8-yard per carry average won’t wow anyone, but the team is holding out hope that a healthy Williams will return to his 2005 form. Grade: C

6 Adam Jones, Tennessee Titans, CB, West Virginia

Analysis: “Pacman” may be the most well-known name in the draft, but for all the wrong reasons. He lasted just two seasons in Tennessee before the NFL suspended him for the 2007 campaign. He earned a brief stint with the Cowboys before spending the 2009 season out of football. Numerous off-the-field issues, all of which have been well-documented, have completely tarnished Jones’ image. He may get another shot with the Bengals, but that is of little consolation to the Titans at this point. As former GM Floyd Reese said, Jones may have been solid when he played, but he was “nothing but a disaster off the field.” This might help explain why Reese no longer has a job in Tennessee. Grade: F

7 Troy Williamson, Minnesota Vikings, WR, South Carolina

Analysis: The Vikings did hit big on a receiver they drafted from South Carolina this decade, only it wasn’t Williamson. Sidney Rice did not enter the fold until 2007, two years after Williamson’s sub par tenure in Minnesota began. Following the 07 campaign, Williamson found his career in Minnesota over and ended up in Jacksonville. He has 87 catches in five years, 79 of those coming in purple. He often dropped key passes and it soon became evident he wasn’t going to pan out with the Vikings. Though the Jaguars are still holding out hope he can be a productive receiver, the Vikings have long realized they made an error in judgment on his talents. Grade: D

8 Antrel Rolle, Arizona Cardinals, CB, Miami (FL)

Analysis: Rolle took a year to get going, but he blossomed in 2006 and has been one of the league’s steadier performers since. He has missed just one game in the last four years, and was converted to free safety in 2008 when the Cardinals went to their first Super Bowl. Showing a knack for the big play, the Giants signed Rolle to a 5-year, $37 million contract this offseason, leaving a hole in Arizona’s secondary. For an organization that had struggled to hit big on draft picks, Rolle represents a number of key young players that helped transform the franchise. Grade: B+

9 Carlos Rogers, Washington Redskins, CB, Auburn

Analysis: Solid if not spectacular would best describe Rogers’ five years in Washington. He has started 29 of 32 games played the last two years, but did not register an interception in 2009. Unfortunately the Redskins have been far from a top-tier team during his time there, so his lack of big plays haven’t singled him out. Grade: C+

10 Mike Williams, Detroit Lions, WR, USC

Analysis: It’s hard to believe Williams has a chance to make the Seattle Seahawks roster this season given how big of a bust he is. After failing to earn draft eligibility and missing the 2004 season at USC, Williams failed miserably in Detroit (sound familiar?). He hasn’t caught a pass in the NFL since 2007, and has just 44 receptions in his career. He never seemed to be in proper shape, and eventually even the Lions had enough. Grade: F

11 DeMarcus Ware, Dallas Cowboys, LB, Troy

Analysis: Bill Parcells and the Cowboys brass actually took some heat for this pick when Shawne Merriman’s career got off to a fast start. The Cowboys were perceived to have taken the wrong pass rusher, but things have gone just swimmingly for Ware and the Cowboys in recent years. Ware has recorded double-digit sacks every year since 2006, and led the league with a franchise-record 20 sacks in 2008. He has proved to not only be a great pass-rusher but also a game-changer. Grade: A

12 Shawne Merriman, San Diego Chargers, LB, Maryland

Analysis: Merriman was once the toast of the NFL after two remarkable seasons to start his career, but even in a 17-sack campaign in 2006 there was controversy when he was suspended four games for steroid use. After another steady season in 2007, Merriman lost all of 2008 with a serious knee injury and hardly regained his Pro Bowl form in 2009 with a paltry 4 sacks. There have been rumors the Bolts are trying to move him, as he has been unhappy in addition to struggling on the field. Still, given what he provided the team his first three seasons, this was one of general manager A.J. Smith’s finest selections. Grade: A-

13 Jammal Brown, New Orleans Saints, OT, Oklahoma

Analysis: It’s a shame that Brown missed the Saints’ Super Bowl season with a sports hernia, because he had been a steady performer during his tenure with New Orleans. He started 58 games the previous four years, and helped protect Drew Brees’ blind side admirably. Jermon Bushrod’s performance last year helped force Brown out of the door, and now he is trying to revive his career in Washington. Still, a strong pick by the Saints. Grade: B+

14 Thomas Davis, Carolina Panthers, LB, Georgia

Analysis: Davis has seemingly gotten better each year, but has a long road to recovery after missing most of 2009 and now possibly all of 2010 with a torn ACL. A tackling machine with a knack for the big play, Davis has probably been the Panthers’ most consistent defensive player since 2006, when he came a full-time starter. 11 sacks and eight fumbles in four-plus years shows that the Panthers made the right selection in Davis. Grade: B+

15 Derrick Johnson, Kansas City Chiefs, LB, Texas

Analysis: Johnson hit a low point last year when he lost his starting job, but has still given Chiefs fans reason for hope during his five-year tenure. He finished 2009 with a bang, returning two interceptions for touchdowns in helping the team to its first win in Denver since 2000. His career numbers are relatively strong (13 sacks, 6 interceptions, 11 forced fumbles), but he has been inconsistent at times. Still, a stabilizing force for a team that desperately needs one. Grade: B

16 Travis Johnson, Houston Texans, DT, Florida State

Analysis: Texans fans will likely remember Johnson most for taunting an unconscious Trent Green in a 2007 game, because his production was minimal at best during four years with the team. Two sacks and no forced fumbles with limited tackles will vouch for that, and Johnson now serves as a backup in San Diego. The Texans have long craved a dominant force on their interior defensive line, and Johnson failed to be that force. Grade: D-

17 David Pollack, Cincinnati Bengals, LB, Georgia

Analysis: A promising rookie campaign in 2005 had Bengals fans excited for Pollack’s future, but his career was quickly derailed two games into the 2006 season with a severe neck injury. Pollack was never able to recover and left fans wondering what if. A bad grade here despite the fact that right off the bat it looked like the team made a big splash with Pollack. Grade: F

18 Erasmus James, Minnesota Vikings, DE, Wisconsin

Analysis: A big swing and a miss by Minnesota, as James started just 11 games in three extremely disappointing years in purple. He logged a paltry five sacks before he was let go, then failed to catch on in Washington and has not played in an NFL game since 2008. His failures forced the Vikings’ hand in trading for All-Pro Jared Allen to give them the pass rusher they coveted, but it cost them two first-round draft picks. Grade: F

19 Alex Barron, St. Louis Rams, OT, Florida State

Analysis: Don’t let the fact that Barron has started all but one game the last four years fool you. He was unable to fill Orlando Pace’s shoes at left tackle, and in the last three years the Rams’ offense has become one of the worst in the league as the franchise has won just six games during that span. Barron was dealt to Dallas this offseason for linebacker Bobby Carpenter. The feeling was that Barron was not only penalty prone but that the effort was not always there. A major underachiever thus far. Grade: D

20 Marcus Spears, Dallas Cowboys, DE, LSU

Analysis: Spears has played all 80 games in his five seasons in Big D, but the production has not always been there. He has recorded just 8 sacks and 3 forced fumbles despite starting 71 of those games, so suffice it to say Spears has been far outperformed by fellow first-rounder DeMarcus Ware. But considering Spears is still on the roster and still has a chance to become the player the Cowboys envisioned, they still get a moderate mark. Grade: C

21 Matt Jones, Jacksonville Jaguars, WR, Arkansas

Analysis: Jones is looking to rebuild his career and his life in Cincinnati (sounds repetitive doesn’t it?) after spending 2009 out of football following an arrest and a release from the Jags, the team that drafted him. Envisioned as a hybrid receiver-QB type, Jones never really made an impact in either facet. He did catch 166 passes for 2,153 yards and 15 touchdowns from 2005-08, but he rarely came up with big games or clutch plays when needed. He also failed to crack the starting lineup until 2008, when he made 10 starts (15 career). His off-the-field troubles forced him out the door and left the Jaguars with a hole at the receiver position. Grade: D

22 Mark Clayton, Baltimore Ravens, WR, Oklahoma

Analysis: Clayton seems to epitomize the first round of the 2005 draft – at least among the players still with the clubs that selected them. Despite staying healthy and playing in all but four of the team’s games since he was drafted, he hasn’t emerged as the go-to guy the team thought he would be, and has now fallen to fourth on the team’s depth chart. His career numbers are fair – 234 receptions for 3,116 yards and 14 touchdowns (2 rushing). But Joe Flacco and the Ravens needed reinforcements as Clayton has failed to be the playmaker they had hoped. Grade: C+

23 Fabian Washington, Oakland Raiders, CB, Nebraska

Analysis: It’s the Raiders, so give Washington some credit for putting up three decent seasons there before ending up in Baltimore. Despite being an afterthought and overshadowed by All-Pro CB Nnamdi Asomugha, Washington tallied 5 interceptions in 2006-07, including 4 during the team’s dismal 2-14 season of ’06. He has logged 22 starts in two seasons since leaving the Black Hole, so he is steady if unspectacular. But the Raiders’ moves rarely make sense, like letting go a steady performer amidst a slew of disappointments on the current roster. Grade: C

24 Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers, QB, California

Analysis: It took four years to finally grade this pick, but Rodgers has paid off in a big way and then some. When Brett Favre’s annual drama queen act became unbearable, the Packers entrusted their faith and future in Rodgers. In return, Rodgers became the first passer in NFL history to throw for 4,000 yards or more in his first two seasons as a starter while leading the Packers to 11 wins last year. Developing an excellent rapport with his receivers, Rodgers is already considered one of the top quarterbacks in the game with room still to improve. Though he rode the bench for three seasons behind Favre, Rodgers’ selection was well worth the wait. Grade: A

25 Jason Campbell, Washington Redskins, QB, Auburn

Analysis: Drafting a quarterback in the first round can be tricky – if you’re the Redskins, that is. Campbell quickly fell out of favor, in part because he never had stability in his offensive system or coaching staff. His stats (namely a 55-38 TD-INT ratio) were respectable, but fans chastised him for his 20-32 record as a starter. He still feels he has something to prove, even if it is in Oakland. Given the plight of the Redskins franchise, Campbell performed admirably, at least up until last season’s 4-12 debacle. Grade: C

26 Chris Spencer, Seattle Seahawks, C, Mississippi

Analysis: Spencer lost his job at center towards the end of last year, and finished the previous season on injured reserve. But he is still around, and figures to give Seattle a boost if he can stay healthy as he did when the team was last successful (he started 29 of 32 games in 06-07 when the Seahawks won their division both years). With Walter Jones gone and a new coaching regime in place, 2010 could be a make-or-break year for Spencer. Grade: B-

27 Roddy White, Atlanta Falcons, WR, UAB

Analysis: White was more of an afterthought during the Michael Vick era in Atlanta, catching just 59 passes in his first two seasons. When he became a full-time starter in 2007, White exploded onto the scene, even during a dismal 4-12 campaign in which his primary quarterbacks were Joey Harrington and Byron Leftwich. 2008-09 were Pro Bowl years for White, and from 07-09 he has averaged 85 catches for 1,246 and 8 touchdowns. A big, physical target, White is now considered a top-flight if not vastly underrated receiver. He and Matt Ryan have a chance to take the Falcons far in 2010. Grade: A

28 Luis Castillo, San Diego Chargers, DE, Northwestern

Analysis: Castillo’s draft stock took a hit when he admitted in a letter to all 32 teams that he used performance-enhancing drugs in college, but Bolts GM A.J. Smith decided to take a chance on him anyway. He hasn’t been a dominant force, but a steady performer nonetheless. He notched 7 of his 16.5 career sacks in just 10 games in 2006, a stat that left fans craving more from him. Instead, his numbers have declined somewhat. But given his ability to stay relatively healthy and be a good locker room presence, the Chargers shouldn’t be knocked too hard for this one. Grade: B-

29 Marlin Jackson, Indianapolis Colts, CB, Michigan

Analysis: Colts fans will always remember Jackson for his game-clinching interception of Tom Brady in the 2006 AFC Championship game to send the Colts to Super Bowl XLI, but after performing steadily from 2005-07, Jackson has barely been able to find the field. After tearing his ACL 7 games into the 2008 season, Jackson played just 4 more last year before reinjuring the knee and ultimately losing his roster spot. He tore up his knee again before ever getting to play a down for Philadelphia, another setback in what has become a sad saga for a once-promising player. But the Colts got plenty from Jackson in those first three years, so as usual, a good job of evaluating talent by GM Bill Polian. Grade: B-

30 Heath Miller, Pittsburgh Steelers, TE, Virginia

Analysis: It is no coincidence the Steelers won the Super Bowl in Miller’s first year. He gave their offense a much-needed threat in the middle of the field, and has not stopped producing since arriving in Pittsburgh. He has missed just two games in five years while recording 244 catches for 2,721 yards and 27 touchdowns, numbers that won’t put him in the Hall of Fame but certainly at the top of this class. The 2009 Pro Bowler’s role will be even more critical in 2010 following the loss of Santonio Holmes. Grade: A-

31 Mike Patterson, Philadelphia Eagles, DT, USC

Analysis: Patterson has shown flashes of brilliance during an otherwise-steady five years with Philly, although some might argue that by USC standards he has been average in the NFL. He has yet to miss a game with the Eagles, and has made 70 of 80 possible starts (all but one of those non-starts came his rookie year). From the interior line, Patterson has tallied 11 sacks, 5 fumble recoveries, and an interception to go along with 196 tackles. The Eagles have also been among the top teams in rush defense during Patterson’s time there, so it would only be fair to give the Eagles a solid mark here. Grade: B

32 Logan Mankins, New England Patriots, OG, Fresno State

Analysis: Not surprisingly, the Patriots hit the jackpot on a player that was hardly a household name before he was drafted. Even at an unglamorous position like guard, Mankins has been a shining star. He has started every game in five years, helping protect Tom Brady (he was only sacked 16 times last season) while paving the way for an offensive that at times has been historically good, like in 2007 when they set a league-record by scoring 589 points. Currently in the middle of a potentially-nasty contract dispute, Mankins is one of the few Patriots players that may be difficult to replace. Grade: A

Other notable players drafted in 2005: Frank Gore, 49ers RB (3rd round, 65th overall), 2-time Pro Bowler who rushed for 1,695 yards in 2006; Darren Sproles, Chargers RB/KR (4th round, 130th overall), 4 career touchdowns on returns; Trent Cole, Eagles DE (5th round, 146th overall), 2-time Pro Bowl pick who has notched 47 sacks in five seasons; Jay Ratliff, Cowboys DT (7th round, 224th overall), 2-time Pro Bowler with 21 career sacks and 10 fumble recoveries from the interior line; Joshua Cribbs, Browns WR/KR (undrafted), 2007 and 09 Pro Bowler who has emerged as one of the game’s most exciting players; Cribbs has scored 10 touchdowns on returns in just five seasons while also adding 908 yards from scrimmage.

 

A look back at the 2005 NFL Draft

The 2005 NFL Draft didn’t have the sizzle that others in recent memory have. The top 10 picks have only produced three Pro Bowlers, and none of those players own superstar status. In fact, it was the later rounds that produced some of the more notable names. There were even five undrafted players that went on to appear in Pro Bowls. Needless to say, 2005 wasn’t exactly the year of the scout. A look back now at the first round and grades on how those players and teams have fared in the five seasons since.

(Update: Little did we know Mike Williams would rebound the way he has, finding new life under Pete Carroll in Seattle. Nevertheless the “F” grade stands for the Lions because they certainly did nothing to bring him along as a player.)

Pick, Player, Team, Pos., School

1 Alex Smith, San Francisco 49ers, QB, Utah

Analysis: At least Smith is still with the 49ers, something that didn’t seem likely just a year ago at this time. Despite his 16-24 career record, head coach Mike Singletary still believes Smith is the guy, even more so than another former number one disappointment, David Carr. Injuries and a lack of stability on the 49ers coaching staff have hampered Smith’s development, which might help explain his 37-43 TD-INT ratio. Credit the organization for sticking by him. 2010 could be his last hurrah in the Bay Area for a San Francisco club that is on the rise in the NFC West. Grade: C-

2 Ronnie Brown, Miami Dolphins, RB, Auburn

Analysis: Brown has played 16 games in a season just once in five seasons, in 2008 when he earned his lone Pro Bowl berth. When healthy, Brown has given the Dolphins the hard-nosed, every-down runner that fits their offensive system – even with Ricky Williams in the mix. But having ended two of the last three campaigns on injured reserve make Williams’ presence all the more necessary. Brown averages 4.4 yards per carry and has scored 31 touchdowns thus far. Pretty good, but a tad sub par for a second overall pick. Grade: B-

3 Braylon Edwards, Cleveland Browns, WR, Michigan

Analysis: The often enigmatic Edwards ultimately wore out his welcome in Cleveland and was shipped off the Jets early last season. He amassed 1,000 yards just once in four full seasons with the Browns, in 2007 when he reached his only Pro Bowl. He seems to have found his groove in New York, providing Mark Sanchez a go-to target for a team that reached the AFC Championship Game last year. But the Browns never got the big-time playmaker they sought when they selected Edwards, just another in a long line of misses by the Mistake by the Lake Browns. Grade: C

4 Cedric Benson, Chicago Bears, RB, Texas

Analysis: Much like Edwards, Benson eventually became more of a headache than a success for the team that drafted him. Unlike Edwards, however, it was Benson’s off-the-field antics that rubbed the Bears organization the wrong way. He failed to outperform Thomas Jones, even when the team reached the Super Bowl after the 2006 season. 674 yards was his high-water mark in three years in the Windy City, but the Bengals saw something in Benson and indeed he resurrected his career there. Last season, Benson rushed for 1,251 yards in just 13 games, including a career-high 189 against his former team. Grade: C-

5 Carnell Williams, Tampa Bay, Buccaneers, RB, Auburn

Analysis: “Cadillac” has given the Bucs quite a ride when healthy, but that has been a novelty. He played just 10 games from 2007-08 after suffering a devastating knee injury. Since his stellar, 1,178-yard rookie campaign, Williams has struggled to produce consistently, in part because the Bucs have turned to several other backs to help contribute. His 3.8-yard per carry average won’t wow anyone, but the team is holding out hope that a healthy Williams will return to his 2005 form. Grade: C

6 Adam Jones, Tennessee Titans, CB, West Virginia

Analysis: “Pacman” may be the most well-known name in the draft, but for all the wrong reasons. He lasted just two seasons in Tennessee before the NFL suspended him for the 2007 campaign. He earned a brief stint with the Cowboys before spending the 2009 season out of football. Numerous off-the-field issues, all of which have been well-documented, have completely tarnished Jones’ image. He may get another shot with the Bengals, but that is of little consolation to the Titans at this point. As former GM Floyd Reese said, Jones may have been solid when he played, but he was “nothing but a disaster off the field.” This might help explain why Reese no longer has a job in Tennessee. Grade: F

7 Troy Williamson, Minnesota Vikings, WR, South Carolina

Analysis: The Vikings did hit big on a receiver they drafted from South Carolina this decade, only it wasn’t Williamson. Sidney Rice did not enter the fold until 2007, two years after Williamson’s sub par tenure in Minnesota began. Following the 07 campaign, Williamson found his career in Minnesota over and ended up in Jacksonville. He has 87 catches in five years, 79 of those coming in purple. He often dropped key passes and it soon became evident he wasn’t going to pan out with the Vikings. Though the Jaguars are still holding out hope he can be a productive receiver, the Vikings have long realized they made an error in judgment on his talents. Grade: D

8 Antrel Rolle, Arizona Cardinals, CB, Miami (FL)

Analysis: Rolle took a year to get going, but he blossomed in 2006 and has been one of the league’s steadier performers since. He has missed just one game in the last four years, and was converted to free safety in 2008 when the Cardinals went to their first Super Bowl. Showing a knack for the big play, the Giants signed Rolle to a 5-year, $37 million contract this offseason, leaving a hole in Arizona’s secondary. For an organization that had struggled to hit big on draft picks, Rolle represents a number of key young players that helped transform the franchise. Grade: B+

9 Carlos Rogers, Washington Redskins, CB, Auburn

Analysis: Solid if not spectacular would best describe Rogers’ five years in Washington. He has started 29 of 32 games played the last two years, but did not register an interception in 2009. Unfortunately the Redskins have been far from a top-tier team during his time there, so his lack of big plays haven’t singled him out. Grade: C+

10 Mike Williams, Detroit Lions, WR, USC

Analysis: It’s hard to believe Williams has a chance to make the Seattle Seahawks roster this season given how big of a bust he is. After failing to earn draft eligibility and missing the 2004 season at USC, Williams failed miserably in Detroit (sound familiar?). He hasn’t caught a pass in the NFL since 2007, and has just 44 receptions in his career. He never seemed to be in proper shape, and eventually even the Lions had enough. Grade: F

11 DeMarcus Ware, Dallas Cowboys, LB, Troy

Analysis: Bill Parcells and the Cowboys brass actually took some heat for this pick when Shawne Merriman’s career got off to a fast start. The Cowboys were perceived to have taken the wrong pass rusher, but things have gone just swimmingly for Ware and the Cowboys in recent years. Ware has recorded double-digit sacks every year since 2006, and led the league with a franchise-record 20 sacks in 2008. He has proved to not only be a great pass-rusher but also a game-changer. Grade: A

12 Shawne Merriman, San Diego Chargers, LB, Maryland

Analysis: Merriman was once the toast of the NFL after two remarkable seasons to start his career, but even in a 17-sack campaign in 2006 there was controversy when he was suspended four games for steroid use. After another steady season in 2007, Merriman lost all of 2008 with a serious knee injury and hardly regained his Pro Bowl form in 2009 with a paltry 4 sacks. There have been rumors the Bolts are trying to move him, as he has been unhappy in addition to struggling on the field. Still, given what he provided the team his first three seasons, this was one of general manager A.J. Smith’s finest selections. Grade: A-

13 Jammal Brown, New Orleans Saints, OT, Oklahoma

Analysis: It’s a shame that Brown missed the Saints’ Super Bowl season with a sports hernia, because he had been a steady performer during his tenure with New Orleans. He started 58 games the previous four years, and helped protect Drew Brees’ blind side admirably. Jermon Bushrod’s performance last year helped force Brown out of the door, and now he is trying to revive his career in Washington. Still, a strong pick by the Saints. Grade: B+

14 Thomas Davis, Carolina Panthers, LB, Georgia

Analysis: Davis has seemingly gotten better each year, but has a long road to recovery after missing most of 2009 and now possibly all of 2010 with a torn ACL. A tackling machine with a knack for the big play, Davis has probably been the Panthers’ most consistent defensive player since 2006, when he came a full-time starter. 11 sacks and eight fumbles in four-plus years shows that the Panthers made the right selection in Davis. Grade: B+

15 Derrick Johnson, Kansas City Chiefs, LB, Texas

Analysis: Johnson hit a low point last year when he lost his starting job, but has still given Chiefs fans reason for hope during his five-year tenure. He finished 2009 with a bang, returning two interceptions for touchdowns in helping the team to its first win in Denver since 2000. His career numbers are relatively strong (13 sacks, 6 interceptions, 11 forced fumbles), but he has been inconsistent at times. Still, a stabilizing force for a team that desperately needs one. Grade: B

16 Travis Johnson, Houston Texans, DT, Florida State

Analysis: Texans fans will likely remember Johnson most for taunting an unconscious Trent Green in a 2007 game, because his production was minimal at best during four years with the team. Two sacks and no forced fumbles with limited tackles will vouch for that, and Johnson now serves as a backup in San Diego. The Texans have long craved a dominant force on their interior defensive line, and Johnson failed to be that force. Grade: D-

17 David Pollack, Cincinnati Bengals, LB, Georgia

Analysis: A promising rookie campaign in 2005 had Bengals fans excited for Pollack’s future, but his career was quickly derailed two games into the 2006 season with a severe neck injury. Pollack was never able to recover and left fans wondering what if. A bad grade here despite the fact that right off the bat it looked like the team made a big splash with Pollack. Grade: F

18 Erasmus James, Minnesota Vikings, DE, Wisconsin

Analysis: A big swing and a miss by Minnesota, as James started just 11 games in three extremely disappointing years in purple. He logged a paltry five sacks before he was let go, then failed to catch on in Washington and has not played in an NFL game since 2008. His failures forced the Vikings’ hand in trading for All-Pro Jared Allen to give them the pass rusher they coveted, but it cost them two first-round draft picks. Grade: F

19 Alex Barron, St. Louis Rams, OT, Florida State

Analysis: Don’t let the fact that Barron has started all but one game the last four years fool you. He was unable to fill Orlando Pace’s shoes at left tackle, and in the last three years the Rams’ offense has become one of the worst in the league as the franchise has won just six games during that span. Barron was dealt to Dallas this offseason for linebacker Bobby Carpenter. The feeling was that Barron was not only penalty prone but that the effort was not always there. A major underachiever thus far. Grade: D

20 Marcus Spears, Dallas Cowboys, DE, LSU

Analysis: Spears has played all 80 games in his five seasons in Big D, but the production has not always been there. He has recorded just 8 sacks and 3 forced fumbles despite starting 71 of those games, so suffice it to say Spears has been far outperformed by fellow first-rounder DeMarcus Ware. But considering Spears is still on the roster and still has a chance to become the player the Cowboys envisioned, they still get a moderate mark. Grade: C

21 Matt Jones, Jacksonville Jaguars, WR, Arkansas

Analysis: Jones is looking to rebuild his career and his life in Cincinnati (sounds repetitive doesn’t it?) after spending 2009 out of football following an arrest and a release from the Jags, the team that drafted him. Envisioned as a hybrid receiver-QB type, Jones never really made an impact in either facet. He did catch 166 passes for 2,153 yards and 15 touchdowns from 2005-08, but he rarely came up with big games or clutch plays when needed. He also failed to crack the starting lineup until 2008, when he made 10 starts (15 career). His off-the-field troubles forced him out the door and left the Jaguars with a hole at the receiver position. Grade: D

22 Mark Clayton, Baltimore Ravens, WR, Oklahoma

Analysis: Clayton seems to epitomize the first round of the 2005 draft – at least among the players still with the clubs that selected them. Despite staying healthy and playing in all but four of the team’s games since he was drafted, he hasn’t emerged as the go-to guy the team thought he would be, and has now fallen to fourth on the team’s depth chart. His career numbers are fair – 234 receptions for 3,116 yards and 14 touchdowns (2 rushing). But Joe Flacco and the Ravens needed reinforcements as Clayton has failed to be the playmaker they had hoped. Grade: C+

23 Fabian Washington, Oakland Raiders, CB, Nebraska

Analysis: It’s the Raiders, so give Washington some credit for putting up three decent seasons there before ending up in Baltimore. Despite being an afterthought and overshadowed by All-Pro CB Nnamdi Asomugha, Washington tallied 5 interceptions in 2006-07, including 4 during the team’s dismal 2-14 season of ’06. He has logged 22 starts in two seasons since leaving the Black Hole, so he is steady if unspectacular. But the Raiders’ moves rarely make sense, like letting go a steady performer amidst a slew of disappointments on the current roster. Grade: C

24 Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers, QB, California

Analysis: It took four years to finally grade this pick, but Rodgers has paid off in a big way and then some. When Brett Favre’s annual drama queen act became unbearable, the Packers entrusted their faith and future in Rodgers. In return, Rodgers became the first passer in NFL history to throw for 4,000 yards or more in his first two seasons as a starter while leading the Packers to 11 wins last year. Developing an excellent rapport with his receivers, Rodgers is already considered one of the top quarterbacks in the game with room still to improve. Though he rode the bench for three seasons behind Favre, Rodgers’ selection was well worth the wait. Grade: A

25 Jason Campbell, Washington Redskins, QB, Auburn

Analysis: Drafting a quarterback in the first round can be tricky – if you’re the Redskins, that is. Campbell quickly fell out of favor, in part because he never had stability in his offensive system or coaching staff. His stats (namely a 55-38 TD-INT ratio) were respectable, but fans chastised him for his 20-32 record as a starter. He still feels he has something to prove, even if it is in Oakland. Given the plight of the Redskins franchise, Campbell performed admirably, at least up until last season’s 4-12 debacle. Grade: C

26 Chris Spencer, Seattle Seahawks, C, Mississippi

Analysis: Spencer lost his job at center towards the end of last year, and finished the previous season on injured reserve. But he is still around, and figures to give Seattle a boost if he can stay healthy as he did when the team was last successful (he started 29 of 32 games in 06-07 when the Seahawks won their division both years). With Walter Jones gone and a new coaching regime in place, 2010 could be a make-or-break year for Spencer. Grade: B-

27 Roddy White, Atlanta Falcons, WR, UAB

Analysis: White was more of an afterthought during the Michael Vick era in Atlanta, catching just 59 passes in his first two seasons. When he became a full-time starter in 2007, White exploded onto the scene, even during a dismal 4-12 campaign in which his primary quarterbacks were Joey Harrington and Byron Leftwich. 2008-09 were Pro Bowl years for White, and from 07-09 he has averaged 85 catches for 1,246 and 8 touchdowns. A big, physical target, White is now considered a top-flight if not vastly underrated receiver. He and Matt Ryan have a chance to take the Falcons far in 2010. Grade: A

28 Luis Castillo, San Diego Chargers, DE, Northwestern

Analysis: Castillo’s draft stock took a hit when he admitted in a letter to all 32 teams that he used performance-enhancing drugs in college, but Bolts GM A.J. Smith decided to take a chance on him anyway. He hasn’t been a dominant force, but a steady performer nonetheless. He notched 7 of his 16.5 career sacks in just 10 games in 2006, a stat that left fans craving more from him. Instead, his numbers have declined somewhat. But given his ability to stay relatively healthy and be a good locker room presence, the Chargers shouldn’t be knocked too hard for this one. Grade: B-

29 Marlin Jackson, Indianapolis Colts, CB, Michigan

Analysis: Colts fans will always remember Jackson for his game-clinching interception of Tom Brady in the 2006 AFC Championship game to send the Colts to Super Bowl XLI, but after performing steadily from 2005-07, Jackson has barely been able to find the field. After tearing his ACL 7 games into the 2008 season, Jackson played just 4 more last year before reinjuring the knee and ultimately losing his roster spot. He tore up his knee again before ever getting to play a down for Philadelphia, another setback in what has become a sad saga for a once-promising player. But the Colts got plenty from Jackson in those first three years, so as usual, a good job of evaluating talent by GM Bill Polian. Grade: B-

30 Heath Miller, Pittsburgh Steelers, TE, Virginia

Analysis: It is no coincidence the Steelers won the Super Bowl in Miller’s first year. He gave their offense a much-needed threat in the middle of the field, and has not stopped producing since arriving in Pittsburgh. He has missed just two games in five years while recording 244 catches for 2,721 yards and 27 touchdowns, numbers that won’t put him in the Hall of Fame but certainly at the top of this class. The 2009 Pro Bowler’s role will be even more critical in 2010 following the loss of Santonio Holmes. Grade: A-

31 Mike Patterson, Philadelphia Eagles, DT, USC

Analysis: Patterson has shown flashes of brilliance during an otherwise-steady five years with Philly, although some might argue that by USC standards he has been average in the NFL. He has yet to miss a game with the Eagles, and has made 70 of 80 possible starts (all but one of those non-starts came his rookie year). From the interior line, Patterson has tallied 11 sacks, 5 fumble recoveries, and an interception to go along with 196 tackles. The Eagles have also been among the top teams in rush defense during Patterson’s time there, so it would only be fair to give the Eagles a solid mark here. Grade: B

32 Logan Mankins, New England Patriots, OG, Fresno State

Analysis: Not surprisingly, the Patriots hit the jackpot on a player that was hardly a household name before he was drafted. Even at an unglamorous position like guard, Mankins has been a shining star. He has started every game in five years, helping protect Tom Brady (he was only sacked 16 times last season) while paving the way for an offensive that at times has been historically good, like in 2007 when they set a league-record by scoring 589 points. Currently in the middle of a potentially-nasty contract dispute, Mankins is one of the few Patriots players that may be difficult to replace. Grade: A

Other notable players drafted in 2005: Frank Gore, 49ers RB (3rd round, 65th overall), 2-time Pro Bowler who rushed for 1,695 yards in 2006; Darren Sproles, Chargers RB/KR (4th round, 130th overall), 4 career touchdowns on returns; Trent Cole, Eagles DE (5th round, 146th overall), 2-time Pro Bowl pick who has notched 47 sacks in five seasons; Jay Ratliff, Cowboys DT (7th round, 224th overall), 2-time Pro Bowler with 21 career sacks and 10 fumble recoveries from the interior line; Joshua Cribbs, Browns WR/KR (undrafted), 2007 and 09 Pro Bowler who has emerged as one of the game’s most exciting players; Cribbs has scored 10 touchdowns on returns in just five seasons while also adding 908 yards from scrimmage.